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Top Problems With Lazy Project Managers

I’ve already discussed that project managers are a necessary addition to a development team, as well as the fact that some are overzealous, which takes its toll on the team dynamics. Today I want to discuss why lazy project managers are actually terrible and destructive additions to any development team.

  • They don’t respond to information requests.  How many times have you contacted someone with a question and not wanted to receive a reply?  I’m not sure that’s ever happened to me, because generally I ask questions with the expectation of an answer.  This is no different for project managers, and in fact, the majority of their job is balancing the plates up in the air while shuffling people toward the end goal.  This requires providing INFORMATION when individuals need it.  An engineer, artist, designer, etc. should not have to ask twice, or even three times for an answer that is relatively easy to obtain.
  • They come to meetings noticeably unprepared. I’ve been to numerous meetings where everyone arrives on time, is ready to contribute and discuss, and all that is necessary is the person in charge to get things underway.  In fact, the project manager has that duty.  So, the meeting begins, he/she then asks what needs to get discussed.  Wait a minute, shouldn’t the purpose of a meeting be to have an agenda?  A plan of action?  Open ended meetings tend to be rather unproductive and useless, which is why we rely upon the manager of the project to get things focused.  Not knowing where people are, what they are to do, or why the meeting was being held in the first place is a huge issue with productivity in teams.
  • The behave reactively, rather than proactively. A sign of any truly great person is their ability to see problems ahead and act on those before they become a problem.  Lazy project managers, however, sit in their cubicles and no one really knows what they’re doing with their time.  The idea is based on the knowledge that they don’t go out of their way to resolve issues ahead of time.  Until YOU go speak to them, the issue doesn’t exist as far as they’re concerned, and in reality, once you leave their office, it gets shoved to the back burner for some YouTube amusement.
  • Are unresponsive unless 1. The boss asks, or 2. you go and talk in person. Everyone is interested in maintaining their job placement for as long as it suits them.  This is a fact of the working world, so of course, when the boss asks a question, the answer must be somewhat forthcoming.  With non-supervisor people, however, the communication channels tend to be more lacking.  In fact, sometimes, the communication becomes non-existent.  This forces the coworkers to actually go to the project manager with questions because they likely will never get answered via the telephone or email.
  • They destroy team enthusiasm and engagement. This is less a feature of lazy project managers, and more of a symptom of having one on a team.  When a project manager is performing their duties to the best extent possible, they provide a level of cohesiveness to the team that is hard to obtain any other way.  This aspect is removed, however, when the project manager is lazy with respect to their duties.  The ties of comradery never fully develop, and in fact, many times are reduced to merely “having to” work with your team on some project that no one cares about.

There are some things I’m missing in the above list, however, these are the most problematic issues I have seen in my time engineering.  Project managers can, and I would argue MUST, be the lynch-pin in any development project.  Success or failure to launch lies significantly on their shoulders, and as such, they should be treated with reverence and respect so long as they get off their asses and do it.

Mind you, more often than not, the project managers I have worked with have been proactive and successful, but those that cause problems are the ones that stick out in peoples’ minds.

What have I missed?  Am I off-base?  Let’s discuss in the comments!

 

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{ 2 } Comments

  1. Peter Taylor | June 3, 2011 at 11:27 am | Permalink

    Yes – they are suffering from the ‘wrong sort of laziness’

    Check out my site for the ‘Art of Productive Laziness’

    Progress isn’t made by wise men; it is made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.

  2. Christian Fey | June 3, 2011 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

    Hey Peter!

    Thanks for the comment! I must wholeheartedly agree that there are, indeed, doing the wrong sort of laziness. To be *effectively* lazy, you must at least put forth the impression to the rest of your team that you are getting things done! Obviously work follows that, because without actually following-through with things you promise, the illusion dissipates.

    I, however, am ALL for being lazy when you have the capability and the means to be so! If you can find a way in ten minutes to automate a ten hour project, then you would have to be a moron not to take the lazy way out!

    Thanks again!
    C

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