Get Off Your Ass And Talk To Them

To preface: no, this is not dating advice.

One thing I’ve noticed during my time as an engineer is an over-reliance on technology to accomplish all communication ends.  By this, I mean that an engineer will sit at their desk and exchange a series of 20+ emails and instant messages to discuss a topic that could have been resolved with a two-minute face-to-face conversation.

Let me begin the discussion by saying that I am a text message fiend (as in, I send over 1000 a month).  I’m also a mild Facebook addict along with Twitter, email and various other social networking sites.  What can I say, I enjoy talking to a lot of people in a variety of ways.  There is nothing wrong with having some level of dependence on networking and communication tools; in fact, I wholeheartedly encourage people to reach out and communicate by any means at your disposal.  The unfortunate side-effect of our technology-driven society is that somehow, the longest-lasting time-honored and effective tool we have, has been largely forgotten: face-to-face communication.  Now, phone conversations also suffice for this to a large extent, but there is something about looking in someone’s eyes and watching how they elaborate on their topics with body language as well as voice inflection that merits a look at the physical proximity of communicating with others.

I recently moved across the country, from Reno, Nevada to Gainesville, Florida.  The move was not lightly taken, but was a huge next step in the life of my family.  This left us with nearly all of our good friends and direct family 3000 miles away.  We call our friends and family as often as we can, but to be honest, speaking with my mother and father is not the same on the phone as it was when we would go out to lunch and enjoy each other’s company for an hour.  By no means am I saying that you should take a different coworker out to lunch every day, but rather making the point that the phone simply is NOT the same as looking at someone while they talk to you.  I have also had many experiences where those 20+ emails went back and forth with no one really understanding what the other was trying to say, only for me to go physically stand in front of them and figure out that, in fact, we’re talking about the exact same problem and have more-or-less the same solution (obviously with some minor tweaks).  The language of an email wasn’t the right mechanism to see the nuances of the conversation, so while I thought my idea was being attacked, the other person was using different terms for their standpoint and feeling like I wasn’t listening.

A former coworker of mine was constantly reminded that his language and tone of his email was unacceptable.  Rather than adjusting his emails’ “tone”, he decided that it’d be easier to append a disclaimer to the end of his emails with rectification steps should his tone be considered inappropriate.  Needless to say, eventually this disclaimer disappeared because the problem was never solved by simply having it there in the email.  When you’d speak to him in person, you could see why people would see his tone as condescending and rude.  He freely spoke his mind and had some sarcasm throughout the conversations with him, however, none of it really was rude.  Back to the point at hand, the tone in his emails was the same, but without the lighthearted amusement that was included in his actual conversation, the essence of his discussions was lost and thought nasty.

Have you had an experience where a conversation through non-face-to-face means turned bad?  Or perhaps, clarified matters in a way that speaking directly to them couldn’t do?   I’m interested to hear!

 

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The Trouble With Toilet Paper

Why the subject of toilet paper you ask? Well, mid-way through my time at my previous employer, someone in management or purchasing thought to themselves, “Hmm. How can we save some money on our lavatory expenses?  Obviously having the clean bathrooms cleaned less frequently is not an option, nor is perhaps having the lights shut off when the whole room is vacant… Ooh, perhaps, the urinals shouldn’t have been converted over to an automatic flush so that a gallon of water each time someone stands in front of it is wasted. No, no, they decided that it would be a great idea to buy cheaper paper.

Ok, so how does buying cheaper toilet paper and paper towels mix with management communication? I’m glad you asked! Looking from a high-level scope, it basically tells your employees that the company is so strapped for cash that they can’t shell out an extra $0.10 per roll in order for you to be more comfortable. Every time someone enters the bathroom and puts these things near their area, there’s a cringe at one of two possible outcomes: 1. The fact that it’s single ply AND cheap means that there are occasionally holes in the paper itself and now I have to use MORE of it to ensure that I don’t touch any of what it might pick up, and 2. I’ll chap what I have down there with the sandpaper finish that the paper provides.

Yes, I understand that this is all whining about something that is so trivial, but when you think about it, is it really trivial? When you decorate a house and put only large chunks of furniture in it with no smaller knick-knacks or sconces or the like, does it feel like it’s well done? I think the answer is no. And I can’t speak for everyone, but whenever I would go to the bathroom and see the paper towels (not to even mention the toilet paper), I think, “Management hates us.”  Well, maybe not so bold, but perhaps “management thinks we don’t deserve mid-range paper.”   Suffice it to say that my mood is in no way improved by the fact that simple things are being penny-pinched.

The other half of this is fascinating to me also. By providing thinner paper, people appear to use more of it each time they go. It’s not unheard of to see someone take the amount of paper provided by the automatic dispenser and yank down to obtain 3-5x the original amount to dry their hands. So all in all, it seems a wash because the money saved on quality is made up for in quantity. I haven’t seen numbers on it (so if anyone in accounting has any idea if the gain is worthwhile, please comment), but the point is not about cost.

While the world is shifting around all of us, layoffs are occurring, deficits abound, paychecks and benefits are being cut, why would an organization decide to do something mildly demoralizing to their employees which will be felt (literally) every single day and possibly more than once per day? HELP ME PEOPLE. Please explain! I know it’s a bit of a rant, but it’s not ABOUT the toilet paper; it’s about all of those little things: coffee brand change, or removal altogether, cancelling holiday parties, charging for things that we never charged for, etc.  The list can go on and on, but the reality is, the employees notice.

P.S. It should go over the roll, not under ;-)

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Project Managers Don’t Listen To Anyone’s Ideas

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5 Ways To Put Assholes In Their Place

Being an asshole is all part of my manly essence

Assholes assholes everywhere…. ok, not really.  I spoke about engineers who behave with utter disregard for anything or anyone but themselves in this post, and now the time has come to elaborate on how a leader can manager these types of individuals.  These can be very easy to deal with (for the idle asshole), or incredibly difficult (with the conniving ones), but regardless of how asshole-like they are, here are some tips to deal with them when they are under your employ.

 

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Asshole Engineers Tear Teams Apart!

Calvin sitting behind a "A swift kick in the butt" stand

This is the second post regarding personality types.  In my prior post regarding shy engineers, I mentioned some of the problems with being a too-shy engineer with respect to your advancement capabilities.  In this post, I want to broach the subject of the completely reverse side of that coin.  In fact, I have to admit there will likely be a bit of cynicism you’ll be able to detect as I write.  I’m referring to those I would like to call assholes.  Now many people have written about assholes, though most of them are referring to managers.  Bob Sutton has even come out with “The No Asshole Rule” which I highly recommend you read, regardless of your level in your organization.

There are a few features common to asshole engineers:

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